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Do have a Fourth of July culture in your workplace?

Everyone has their own definition of culture, but at Snagajob, we define it as the norms, values and behaviors that belong to a specific group.

July Fourth has a very powerful culture. Ponder these questions and answers:

- What is Fourth of July food? Anything you can grill.

- What is Fourth of July attire? Shorts and flip flops.

- What should you do on July Fourth? Spend time with friends and family, watch fireworks and, hopefully, take a moment to think about our independence.

Mentioning the Fourth of July to an American evokes specific images, feelings and actions. For some people, the July Fourth culture makes it their favorite holiday, and others prefer the Thanksgiving or New Year’s Eve culture.

Using this example, think about your workplace culture. What would employees say it’s like to work in your business? What are the behavioral norms that define your workplace? Is there a word that can describe the feeling at your workplace? Does your culture make people want to work for you or does it repel applications?

If your workplace culture leaves something to be desired, then it’s time to devote resources to building a stronger front-line culture that will keep employees engaged and make top talent want to work for you.

Consider that half of all relationships between hourly employees and their employers end within six months – most of the time within the first 90 days, according to People Report. Or that Gallup estimates that when disengaged, hourly workers cost the United States economy more than $350 billion a year. Whether from turnover costs or the price of disengaged employees, not focusing on your front-line culture is costly.

Over the next few months, we’re going to spend more time talking about how to cultivate a healthy front-line culture that will motivate your hourly employees and build an outstanding customer experience.

In the meantime, take this holiday built around reflection to consider your business from the cultural perspective, and then think if you’d want to work in your culture or if it would motive you to work harder. If you answered “no” to either question, stick with us and we’ll give you the tools to turn things around.

Here’s hoping you have a chance to enjoy a hot dog or tofu burger this holiday, and that next year you’ll be celebrating your independence from an ineffective workplace culture.

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Courtney Moyer is a content producer at Snagajob. When she’s not creating content for employers, she can be found painting anything that stands still, pretending she’s the next Food Network Star, or spending QT with her husband and Abraham Lincoln – the dog, not the president.

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